social media

The psychology behind successful social media posts by Isabelle Ringnes

I refer to Buffer a lot, but they do have amazing content. So not surprisingly they recently posted about the science of social media influence and how to make posts more persuasive based on the psychology of human minds. 

Buffer's post is inspired by Dave Straker's website Changing Minds , a site that has a variety of psychology terms neatly organized in specific categories for easy reference. 

As a social media marketer (or marketer in general) you are familiar with the process of trying to find the magic content that engages your readers enough to make them want to share and increase your earned media percentage. I decided to include some of the most important ones here: 

Amplification Hypothesis: 

When you express something with certainty, your attitude hardens. The opposite holds true too- if you express an attitude with uncertainty it softens the attitude. 

Conversion Theory: 

The minority in a group can have a disproportionate effect on influencing those in the majority. Typically, those in the majority who are most susceptible are the ones who may have joined because it was easy to do so or felt they lacked alternatives. Consistent, confident minority voices are most effective. 

Reciprocity norm: 

The feeling we get after other have done something for us. We feel obligated to return the favor. 

Scarcity principle:

People often want what is in short supply. The desire increases if there is a time limit present as well. 

Social influence:

People are strongly influenced by others based on how we perceive our relationship to the influencer. We tend to be influenced by recommendations from authoritative sources, big brands and peers.

Ultimate terms:

Some terms are more persuasive than others. See this post to see what words work. I can reveal that the five most persuasive words include: You, Because, Free, Instantly and New. 

Read the rest of the article on the psychology behind great social media posts here

If This Then That by Isabelle Ringnes

This is a great service that allows you to seamlessly complete two tasks at the same time without the extra effort. You simply sync accounts with the service IFTT and make recipes for what you want done. Some suggestions include:

-automatically turn your phone on silent when your geo location picks up that you are the office (and unmute it when you get home)

-automatically make your latest Instagram photo your wallpaper

-automatically download any photos tagged of you on Facebook to dropbox

-automatically save Facebook photos you're tagged in to iOS photos

-automatically receive a message to bring an umbrella when it rains

There are a ton of recipes you can set up and many to be inspired by available on their website. I highly recommend it. They recently launched the app for Android as well. Have fun being effective!

How often should you post on social media? by Isabelle Ringnes

Fast Company published a great article from Buffer featuring solid statistics on how often you should post to the various social networks your brand is present The article says it all, but I have chosen to highlight a few of the most important ones. 

Facebook and Google +: Post once a day, optimally 5-10 times a week. Facebook posts reach their half-life at 90 minutes. A post reaches 75% of its potential in the first five hours. 

Twitter: Tweet five times a day (small businesses). However, if you want to bring the most value out of your Twitter presence a s whole, tweet up to 30 times a day. A tweet has a 18 minute life expectancy, and reaches 75% of its potential in the first 3 hours.. 46% of customers expect a support request to be answered on Twitter within 60 minutes.

LinkedIn: 20 posts a month or one every weekday (this strategy reaches 60% of your audience). 

Email: Statistics show that emails have the highest opening rate between 8 PM and midnight because they are more likely to stand out alone in your inbox. 

Predict. Measure. Repeat. 

Post when your followers are online and adjust for time zones. 

Followerwonk is a tool that allows you to find find, analyze and optimize you Twitter presence for social growth. This can be used to determine when your followers are online and post accordingly. 

Good luck!

What gets measured, gets managed. by Isabelle Ringnes

Addictomatic: Search for any key word and create a custom page that pulls together data about that keyword available from a wide variety of websites. 

Bloglines: Bloglines makes is easy to find and track your favorite websites and blogs in real-time. You can customize your dashboard with multiple view options, drag and drop organization, and exclusive widgets. 

Social Mention: Search for any keyword and get the latest updates in real time. It also measures the passion, sentiment, reach, top users, strength and top keywords of whatever your search quest is. 

Technocrati: High quality search site for sifting through blogs. Is not up to date, but the quality of the results is generally very high.

Hootsuite: A social media management dashboard. Allows you to monitor and manage all your social media platforms in one interface. There is also an option to " go pro" in which you can get reports and summaries of your social networking efforts. Perfect for marketers. 

Trackur.com: Social media monitoring. Easy interface, simple navigation and fast response. 

Here is a list of other social media monitoring tools.